The Big X in the Sky, There She Goes, and an Incredible Mix

BIG-X

Shot by yours truly this morning. The Big X in the Sky.

ThereSheGoes

Then, a second later, squinting at the sky— There She Goes.

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Experience #2: Daydream (or something similar)

By Euphony Café

No shit—dreamers, shoe gazers, carriers of broken hearts, trippers lost in their own lost land, I kid you knot, kids: this mix is it.

ps wtf is it with me and the moon [QM]. No really.

pps this ties in so directly with my recent BLACK SUN post. so bizarre. or maybe i’m just a dolt seduced by easy and crude associations.

I don’t know. Enjoy. Happy Saturday.

Ω

EDITED TO ADD: YES I SPELLED KNOT LIKE THAT ON PURPOSE.

Nick Mamatas asks: Was H.P. Lovecraft a Good Writer? (also, a rant by yours truly)

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DRAX SAYS:

This is an unusual re-post for me, because I am firmly in the camp that Lovecraft sucks. But my hero, Saint Nick, makes a sound, reasoned, and stirring argument for Lovecraft’s worth as a wordsmith, storyteller, and creepy dreamer. His essay is very deserving of every fantasy writer’s time and attention. I urge you to read it.

But first—

Q: Mister Drax, why does Lovecraft suck?

A: First and obviously: the racism. Every third sentence is infused with jaw dropping xenophobia. I just can’t read it. I want to rip the book in half. This is important. An artist’s personal and political views are one thing, it’s another when hate is embedded in the work itself. Every sentence affects a reader in a different way. When a neo-Nazi skinhead reads “those dusky foreigners” when describing American blacks or American Indians and nods Yes, Yes, that’s another young brain-damaged sociopath receiving validation from a “great” and “revered” writer. It’s unacceptable.

Q: Anything else?

A: Lovecraft’s unrepentant COWARDICE. He’s as scared of the dust bunnies in the corner of his room as he is of the unforgiving maw of the cosmos, he’s as scared of taking a shit as he is of one of his fucking intra-dimensional demons. Yeah, I know: these are intended as stories of dread and horror. But come on, man—none of his characters ever stand up and fight. They always just run.

Q: Last words?

A: Yeah. I’m really amazed at the vitality of Lovecraft’s legacy in the last ten years, even now in 2014, but it’s largely for superficial and graphic reasons. Yog-Sothoth can suck my dick, kids. Fantasy writers! Fantasy artists! WOULD YOU PLEASE EJECT THE OCTOPI?! Please. Please. Enough already.

Deep breath.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

NICK MAMATAS IN DEFENSE OF H.P. LOVECRAFT

Was H.P. Lovecraft a good writer?

There’s a petition going around requesting that the World Fantasy Award change its prize from a bust of H.P. Lovecraft to one of Octavia Butler, and it is a ridiculous petition for several reasons. The one non-ridiculous reason is that H.P. Lovecraft’s racism stains his legacy and upsets many people, as well it should. Back in 2011 I made an alternative suggestion of a chimera for the World Fantasy award’s prize.With that out of the way, let’s discuss the reasons the petition is ridiculous:

1. Octavia Butler was not known as a fantasist, did not write fantasy for the most part, and did not primarily identify as a fantasist. The one big exception is Kindred, which she declared a “grim fantasy”, even as critics have suggested that it is SF about genetics and evolutionary psychology. (An example.)

2. She’s a well-loved figure though, which means that there’s a lot of enthusiasm for the petition right now. It also potentially makes a heavy brickbat for anyone who comes out against the petition. A few years ago, some people tried to rally HWA to get the Bram Stoker First Novel category named after Charles Grant…who had little to do with first novels other than having published one himself. (He did cultivate new authors via short stories.) When some objected to the name change, there were all sorts of quivering lips and lamentations that garsh too bad people don’t care that Charlie is moldering in the ground, alone and forgotten snif snif… So, you were either in favor of the name change, or in favor of digging Grant up and shitting on his corpse, you meanie.

Or, shorter: it is always a bad idea to make a person into a prize, since the prize is then tied to the reputation of the person. (Sometimes prizes are designed to rehabilitate a reputation, a la the Nobel.) With writers, whose works are always up for reappraisal, this is especially fraught. The Lovecraft/World Fantasy issue is an example of that. Is Butler’s reputation so fully bulletproof, forever? Don’t count on it.

3. The petition also claims that Lovecraft was “a terrible wordsmith.” Wrong. Lovecraft was a superior writer. As I put it on Twitter, “he had a pretty clear aesthetic and used polyphony well to build authority for the ineffable.” Generally, complaints about Lovecraft’s writing boils down to “He said ‘squamous’ and I had to look that up.” Petitioner Daniel José Older previously said of another word associated with Lovecraft, cyclopean: “What image are we to take from this? Buildings with a single window at the top? Buildings built by one-eyed giants? It means nothing to me visually, yet it’s clearly one of Lovecraft’s favorite adjectives.” Yes, well, look it up. Cyclopean means gigantic and uneven and rough-hewn. Cyclopean masonry is a term of art in archeology. Lovecraft was actually a skilled wordsmith, and chose very specific language. Older himself notes that Lovecraft used “collage[s] of firsthand documents and local lore told with thick, regional accents.” Lovecraft wasn’t a one-note bleater of ten-dollar words; he used the lingo his various characters would have. And as such, he could be

whimsical: Non-Euclidean calculus and quantum physics are enough to stretch any brain, and when one mixes them with folklore, and tries to trace a strange background of multi-dimensional reality behind the ghoulish hints of the Gothic tales and the wild whispers of the chimney-corner, one can hardly expect to be wholly free from mental tension. (“Dreams in the Witch House”)

understated: Thaddeus went mad in September after a visit to the well. He had gone with a pail and had come back empty-handed, shrieking and waving his arms, and sometimes lapsing into an inane titter or a whisper about “the moving colours down there.” Two in one family was pretty bad, but Nahum was very brave about it. (“The Colour Out of Space”)

baroque: I shall plan my cousin’s escape from that Canton mad-house, and together we shall go to marvel-shadowed Innsmouth. We shall swim out to that brooding reef in the sea and dive down through black abysses to Cyclopean and many-columned Y’ha-nthlei, and in that lair of the Deep Ones we shall dwell amidst wonder and glory for ever. (“The Shadow Over Innsmouth”)

self-reflexively ironical: My tale had been called “The Attic Window”, and appeared in the January, 1922, issue of Whispers. In a good many places, especially the South and the Pacific coast, they took the magazines off the stands at the complaints of silly milksops; but New England didn’t get the thrill and merely shrugged its shoulders at my extravagance. (“The Unnameable”)

parodic: Later traded to Jacques Caboche, another settler, it [the skull of a Roman named "Ibid"—NK] was in 1850 lost in a game of chess or poker to a newcomer named Hans Zimmerman; being used by him as a beer-stein until one day, under the spell of its contents, he suffered it to roll from his front stoop to the prairie path before his home—where, falling into the burrow of a prairie-dog, it passed beyond his power of discovery or recovery upon his awaking. (“Ibid”)

hysteric: The space-time globule which we recognize as the totality of all cosmic entity is only an atom in the genuine infinity which is theirs. And as much of this infinity as any human brain can hold is eventually to be opened up to me, as it has been to not more than fifty other men since the human race has existed. (“The Whisperer in Darkness”)

straightforward: The train service to Brattleboro is not bad – you can get a timetable in Boston. Take the B. & M. to Greenfield, and then change for the brief remainder of the way. I suggest your taking the convenient 4:10 P.M. – standard-from Boston. This gets into Greenfield at 7:35, and at 9:19 a train leaves there which reaches Brattleboro at 10:01. That is weekdays. Let me know the date and I’ll have my car on hand at the station. (“The Whisperer in Darkness”, from the same Akeley letter, composed by aliens as a trap, as above. The implied story point in shifting from hysteric to straightforward is obvious.)

We could go on picking sentences and paragraphs indefinitely, but let’s not. We should also look at pacing. One might say that a Lovecraft story stays afloat by way of masterful deployment of eerie details. That would be a quote from Older again, who apparently thinks what…that Lovecraft was a good writer when it came to pacing, but a terrible one when it came to words and sentences? And yet pacing is simply a matter of the speed with which one is compelled to read on. So we can’t mean sentences, but just individual words—a wordsmith that creates a masterful pace out of bad word choices?

It’s really not that difficult. Why does “cyclopean” appear in, say, “The Shadow Over Innsmouth”? The narrator is a student and a declassed part of New England’s elite. (He discovers that he’s a descendent of the wealthy Obed Marsh.) He’d know the word and use it. Would the station agent in the same story use it? No, he’d say something like “Leaves the square – front of Hammond’s Drug Store – at 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. unless they’ve changed lately. Looks like a terrible rattletrap – I’ve never been on it.” And he does. Lovecraft’s narrators are often intellectuals—is it really a surprise that Peaslee, a professor of political economy, narrates “The Shadow Out of Time” like so:

This is a highly important fact in view of the shadow which fell so suddenly upon me from outside sources. It may be that centuries of dark brooding had given to crumbling, whisper-haunted Arkham a peculiar vulnerability as regards such shadows—though even this seems doubtful in the light of those other cases which I later came to study. But the chief point is that my own ancestry and background are altogether normal. What came, came from somewhere else—where, I even now hesitate to assert in plain words.

Let’s compare it to the rhetoric of an actual political economist:

On this sandy and false foundation we scheme for social improvement and dress our political platforms, pursue our animosities and particular ambitions, and feel ourselves with enough margin in hand to foster, not assuage, civil conflict in the European family. Moved by insane delusion and reckless self-regard, the German people overturned the foundations on which we all lived and built. But the spokesmen of the French and British peoples have run the risk of completing the ruin, which Germany began, by a Peace which, if it is carried into effect, must impair yet further, when it might have restored, the delicate, complicated organization, already shaken and broken by war, through which alone the European peoples can employ themselves and live.

That’s Keynes, btw, in the introduction to The Economic Consequences of the Peace from 1919. Similar sentence structures, similar free use of figurative language, and a sense of holding court even in the preliminary throat-clearings before a case is being set out. Switch Keynes for a Yithian for a few years, and he’d come back nervous and drooling and sounds even more like Peaslee than he already does.

Of course Lovecraft’s prose is not perfect, and is not beyond criticism. But if there are aspects to wordsmithing that go beyond matching prose to character; the ability to strike several different tones and moods both within and between stories; and pacing that keeps a reader riveted to the page and suspending disbelief despite unrealistic, phantasmagorical, and occasionally gruesome descriptions, they are minor aspects. It’s perfectly acceptable to object to Lovecraft’s themes, which are often explicitly or implicitly racist and xenophobic (and inseparable from the text), but that’s not the same as claiming that he’s a bad writer or a terrible wordsmith. It’s also perfectly acceptable to complain that most of his narrators just have some horrible experience, or hear about one from the past after coming across traces of a supernatural reality, and then go crazy. But that’s not about being a “wordsmith” either.

When you don’t know the meaning of a word, look it up. It was good advice in third grade, it is good advice now.

Ω

CATS IN TANKS

via @GhoulFriday

Ω

Simon Drax, Writer

DraxAvatar_by_MXM_2

Portrait by Maxim Peter Griffin

Yeah, remember him? The guy with the omnipresent cigarette who once upon a time wrote and infrequently published movie reviews, poems, stories, and the half fractured book? Well, lock up your cats and daughters—Simon Drax has limped back to life.

These are the projects in which I’m currently engaged…

EXIT VECTOR

Jeffrey C Jones_birch

Yeah, I know. But this story is still important to me, and I want to put it to rest. I rewrote the first chapter back in March, and I’m pretty pleased with it. I want to tell the story I didn’t tell, tell the story I’d promised to tell. You can read the revised first chapter here.

†  †  †

UNTITLED BONDAGE SF FANTASY (NSFW)

Aaaah… yes. That’s right. Basically it’s a rip-off of THE TERMINATOR, except with hot women tied-up in every chapter. THE BLACK HOLE IN THE CENTER OF OUR GALAXY! ALIEN TROOPS FROM ANDROMEDA—AND FROM THE FUTURE! THE TRIPLE GODDESS! You can read a sample here.

dollysofyonthetiles11

† †  †

THE PLOT AGAINST THE GIANT

I am not saying BOO about this story/ novel, but I will share an illustration created for me by the (0nce again) incredibly talented

Maxim Peter Griffin

drax3

†  †  †

TWIN FUCKING PEAKS

I’m writing short essays about my “TWIN PEAKS” experience for as a yet untitled anthology about  the “TWIN PEAKS” effect on modern culture, later TV, film. There’s a lot to chew on. I submitted my first piece: it was about the night I taped the first episode. (Obviously, I can’t share this, as it’s for a forthcoming book.) Now, crazily, I want to to jump into a massive essay about “FIRE WALK WITH ME.” Good art is never linear.

† † †

and finally,

THE LAST STAR IN THE SKY

I’m going to publish this as a Kindle Single on amazon for 99 cents a pop. Why not?

star_cover1

So if you want a copy before I take down the page, DO IT NOW.

And that is all. If even ONE of these projects reach conclusion before December 31, 2014, I will be a happy man.

Ω

CHILDREN OF DRAX!

CHILDREN OF DRAX

Dakota and Damien in an excellent comic shop on Friday, August 1, 2014.

Photo courtesy @TheCathInTheHat

Ω

Ashtray Chat: What Do You Think About This, Kids? THE MAD MAX FURY ROAD TRAILER

George Miller, creator and director of the classic MAD MAX movies, has been threatening/promising us with the sequel FURY ROAD for nearly fifteen years. In 2015, it’ll finally be here.

Your humble curator has some problems.

1: There’s no good reason on Earth that Mel Gibson isn’t playing Max in this movie. Yeah, yeah, I’m always thumping for reinvention, but—I just can’t accept another actor other than Mel in the role of Max. Not while Mel’s still walking and talking (and drinking). For fuck’s sake, they made Max look old in the horrid THUNDERDOME, and that was in 1985! Sorry, but MEL OR HELL is my motto.

2. Yes, every bit of this trailer looks “awesome,” but I can point to 96% of it and say, “That came from ROAD WARRIOR. And that came from ROAD WARRIOR. And THAT came from ROAD WARRIOR!”

(To play devil’s advocate w/ myself for a moment: There’s not a single sequence in THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK that doesn’t have its origins from the original STAR WARS, A NEW HOPE. However, EMPIRE is clearly the superior film. And the elements/sequences lifted from the first film were extended to nearly dreamlike extremes—yes, you can find their origins if you dig for them, but there’s no overt Tie Fighter battle, no trash compactor, no Death Star trench.)

2, continued: So, I’m seeing SO many shots/elements lifted carbon copy from ROAD WARRIOR in this trailer. Which depresses me.

3. IF THIS IS A DIRECT SEQUEL TO ROAD WARRIOR, HOW THE FUCK DOES HE SECURE ANOTHER V-8 INTERCEPTOR?!?!

(sorry. had to let the über geek out of his cage for a second)

4. What’s up with the quintet of babes?! It not only echoes The Warrior Woman from RW (times five) but this pisses me off because I’m currently writing two “Triple Goddess” stories and I just want to scream BACK the FUCK off!

Allright that last one doesn’t mean anything to anybody except me (maybe), but I still had to fire it off.

I don’t know. I’ll still probably be second in line for MAD MAX FURY ROAD. But I’ll be yelling “MEL! MEL! MEL.”

Ω

NEW FRONTIERSMAN, THIS ONE’S FOR YOU

Far and away the absolute balls-out BEST Space:1999 fan-film ever made. Hawks! UFOs! The Meta Probe! Best Graphics of The Moon blasting out of Earth Orbit! This one’s for you, G.

Love,

SATAN

Ω

STARLOG Magazine Archived for Free

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When I was 12 years old, the hunt for new issues of this magazine was the goddamn Holy Grail.

HERE.

Via i09: The whole thing is searchable, so you can see exactly what people were saying about your favorite shows and movies (and sometimes books) back in the day. And even though it’s free, you can always make a donation to the Internet Archive to support all their work preserving our digital heritage. [via Darren Werschler]

Starlog was a monthly science-fiction film magazine published by Starlog Group Inc. The magazine was created by publishers Kerry O’Quinn and Norman Jacobs. O’Quinn was the magazine’s editor while Jacobs ran the business side of things, dealing with typesetters, engravers and printers. They got their start in publishing creating a soap opera magazine. In the mid-1970s, O’Quinn and high school friend David Houston talked about creating a magazine that would cover science fiction films and television programs.

O’Quinn came up the idea of publishing a one-time only magazine on the Star Trek phenomenon. Houston’s editorial assistant Kirsten Russell suggested that they include an episode guide to all three seasons of the show, interviews with the cast and previously unpublished photographs. During this brainstorming session many questions were raised, most notably legal issues. Houston contacted Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry with the intention of interviewing him for the magazine. Once they got his approval, O’Quinn and Jacobs proceeded to put together the magazine but Paramount Studios, who owned Star Trek, wanted a minimum royalty that was greater than their projected net receipts and the project was shelved. O’Quinn realized that they could create a magazine that only featured Star Trek content but without it being the focus and therefore getting around the royalties issue. He also realized that this could be the science fiction magazine he and Houston had talked about. Many titles for it were suggested, including Fantastic Films and Starflight before Starlog was chosen. (Fantastic Films was later used as the title of a competing science fiction magazine published by Blake Publishing.)

To keep costs down, Starlog was initially a quarterly magazine with the first issue being published on August 1976. The issue sold out and this encouraged O’Quinn and Jacobs to publish a magazine every six weeks instead of quarterly. O’Quinn was the magazine’s first editor with Houston taking over for a year and then replaced by Howard Zimmerman when Houston was promoted to the “Hollywood Bureau.” Zimmerman was eventually succeeded by David McDonnell.

One of the magazine’s milestones was its 100th issue, published on November 1985 and featured who they thought were the 100 most important people in science fiction. This included exclusive interviews with John Carpenter, Peter Cushing, George Lucas, Leonard Nimoy, and Gene Roddenberry. The magazine’s 200th issue repeated the format of the 100th issue but this time interviewed such notable artists as Arthur C. Clarke, Tim Burton, William Gibson, Gale Anne Hurd, and Terry Gilliam. Starlog was one of the first publications to report on the development of the first Star Wars movie, and it also followed the development of what was to eventually become Star Trek: The Motion Picture. The magazine was devoted to science fiction films, television series, and books. Many fans of this long-running magazine considered its heyday to have been the 1980s with very little substance to the content in later years and many of its long-time contributors having since moved on. But it continued to boast some top-flight genre journalists, including film historians Will Murray, Jean-Marc Lofficier and Tom Weaver. It was one of the longest-running and most popular publications of its type.

It published its 30th Anniversary issue in 2006. On Wednesday, December 5, 2007 at approximately 11 a.m. a warehouse, operated by Kable News, in Oregon, Illinois containing back issues of Starlog and Fangoria burned to the ground.

Thanks to Mike Maginnis for his contributions to this collection.
Browse by Subject / Keywords

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Yes. Nostalgia is death. But oh, the stories I could tell about hunting for this magazine… Maybe I will…

(and yeah, I’m going to finish my piece on Gerry Anderson REAL soon)

Ω

SECRET THIRTEEN MIX 107 – ERNESTAS SADAU

Secret-Thirteen-Mix-107-Ernestas-Sadau-Dausa

THE AUTHOR OF THE MIX IS ERNESTAS SADAUNIKAS (B. 1984), A LITHUANIAN DJ, PROMOTER AND MASTER CHEF BASED IN LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM. SADAUNIKAS HAS BEEN BUILDING HIS MUSICAL IDENTITY UNDER ERNESTAS SADAU AND DAUSA PSEUDONYMS FOR OVER A DECADE NOW. INFLUENCED BY THE EARLY AUTECHRE, PRODIGY, APHEX TWIN PRODUCTION AND HIS PARENTS’ VAST RECORD COLLECTION, WHICH INCLUDES MUSIC RANGING FROM THE DOORS TO DONNA SUMMER, SADAUNIKAS BEGAN A FRUITFUL DJ CAREER. AVOIDING ANY STYLISTIC FRAMES HE PRESENTS AN ECLECTIC DJ SETS THAT VARY BETWEEN STRICT TECHNO, SMOOTH JAZZ, ROCK AND VARIOUS EXPERIMENTATIONS. SADAUNIKAS SHARED A STAGE WITH SUCH HONORABLE MUSICIANS AS FENNESZ, MURCOF, APPARAT, PETER VAN HOESEN AND MANY OTHERS. IN 2006 HE JOINED LITHUANIAN MINIMAL TECHNO COMMUNITY MINIMAL.LT AND BECAME AN ACTIVE MEMBER OF IT. HE IS ALSO A FOUNDER OF “SŪPYNĖS” (ENG. “SWINGS”), ONE OF THE BIGGEST ELECTRONIC MUSIC FESTIVAL IN THE BALTIC STATES. HOWEVER, LATER HE LEFT MINIMAL.LT AND STARTED TO FOCUS MORE ON HIS FUTURE PROJECTS. HIS NEWEST IMPRINT DIGITAL TSUNAMI SPECIALIZES IN ORGANISING PARTIES IN LONDON AND PUBLISHING SUBTLE DANCE MUSIC COMPILATIONS. HE IS ALSO A MEMBER OF DJ DUO GLARK N GLARK AND SOMETIMES SELECTS MUSIC FOR FASHION SHOWS.

RIGHT-CLICK AND SAVE A COPY OF ERNESTAS SADAU MIX

“SECRET THIRTEEN MIX 107” IS A DELICATE AND VARIED MUSIC SELECTION THAT MIRRORS ITS AUTHOR’S DAILY INTIMATE SURROUNDINGS AND REVEALS SOME OF HIS FAVOURITE RECORDS THAT MADE AN ESSENTIAL IMPACT TO HIM AS AN ARTIST AND AS AN INDIVIDUAL. WHILE COMPILING THIS MIX SADAUNIKAS WAS INFLUENCED BY FEMME FATALES, MYSTICISM, SEX AND, MOST IMPORTANT, HIS OBSESSION WITH FOOD MAKING. THIS MIX IS ALSO A REMINISCENCE OF HIS EARLIER SELECTION “CABERNET SAUVIGNON” THAT WAS MEANT TO BE LISTENED NEAR A GLASS OF NOBLE RED WINE. IN THIS MIX SADAUNINKAS BALANCES FROM SUBTLY SEDUCTIVE EMOTIONS AND HAPPENINGS TO SURREAL AND GLOOMY MOODS. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE MUSICAL NARRATIVE IS DELIBERATE, PATIENT AND CONTINUOUS. THIS SMOOTHLY SHIFTING SELECTION PERFECTLY EXPLORES COHERENT CONNECTION AMONG DIFFERENT MUSIC STYLES, PERIODS AND MEANINGS BEHIND THE WORKS. THE MIX CONTAINS 12 SOLID AND HIGH-QUALITY RECORDS THAT WERE RELEASED BETWEEN 1972 AND 2012. CHARACTERISTIC COMPOSITIONS BY SUCH RESPECTABLE MUSICIANS AS JON HASSELL, COIL, AUTECHRE, AFRICAN HEAD CHARGE, ALICE COLTRANE AND OTHERS SIMPLY DISCONNECT THE LISTENER FROM THE SHINY AND HYPOCRITICAL WORLD AND OPEN A MORE SCENIC HORIZONS DEEP IN THE SUBCONSCIOUSNESS. THE CONTROVERSIAL ENERGY, STRANGE PASSION, WISDOM AND VARIOUS MELANCHOLIA EXPRESSIONS THAT WERE TRANSMITTED FROM THESE PROFESSIONALLY PERFORMED AND QUALITATIVELY RECORDED TRACKS SHOULD INSPIRE AND LEAVE NO APATHETIC. SADAUNIKAS EXPLAINS THAT THIS MIX IS HIS “ONE EARLY MORNING’S EXPRESSION OF EGOISM THAT ENDED WITH AN EJACULATION”. FINALLY, IT IS LIKE A SPECIFIC GILBERT HSIAO’S ABSTRACT WORK “SLIPSTREAM” WHERE ELEGANT AND UNUSUAL SHAPE DECORATED WITH GRADUALLY TRANSFORMING LINES CREATES AN ARTISTIC MIRAGE THAT REQUIRES OPEN IMAGINATION AND ART EXPERIENCE TO FULLY ABSORB IT.

via @johncoulthart 

Ω

yes we are still alive

StillAlive

Ω

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